Prognosis



Prognosis is the forecast of the probable course and (or) outcome of a disease and has been described as an important but neglected branch of clinical science [1 -3 ]. Prognostic models and prediction rules for several musculoskeletal conditions are now beginning to emerge but how many patients actually want to be given information on the likely outcome of their condition. Prognosis statistics

should be used as a reference, but not a final predictor of your specific case. Every person's situation is different and should be treated individually. Prognosis also profoundly affects decisions to initiate, withhold or terminate life support for critically ill newborns and adults, and it figures in the discussions about these decisions that doctors have with patients' families. Prognostication is critical when one must allocate scarce medical resources to those patients for whom they can do the most good.

Prognosis also depends on the risk assessment of an acute myocardial infarction (AMI) on admission and on the type of treatment subsequently given. In many cases, revascularization by angioplasty, directional atherectomy, stenting, or CABG improves the prognosis.

Prognosis is derived from Ancient Greek and can translate to foreseeing or foreknowledge. It can sometimes get confused with the word diagnosis, which means to give name to a person's health condition or decide what ailments they suffer from. Prognosis is most often expressed as the percentage of patients who are expected to survive over five or ten years. Cancer prognosis is a notoriously inexact process.

Medical studies have demonstrated that most doctors are overly optimistic when giving prognostic information, that is, they tend to overstate how long the patient might live. For patients who are critically ill, particularly those in an intensive care unit , there are numerical prognostic scoring systems that are more accurate. Medical studies have demonstrated that most doctors are overly optimistic when giving prognostic information, that is, they tend to overstate how long the patient might live. For patients who are critically ill, particularly those in an intensive care unit , there are numerical prognostic scoring systems that are more accurate. Medical statistics can be valuable snapshots, but they only tell part of the story. The statistics discussed in this article are addressed to pleural mesothelioma and peritoneal mesothelioma , which develop in the outer lung lining and the abdominal cavity respectively.

Medical prognoses are often misleading for they are based upon medical experience, while cases cared for without poisonous and suppressive methods frequently mock at medical prognosis. Their estimates) are of no value except where their methods are employed.

Patients may want to consider whether or not they want to know their prognosis at all. And with any prognosis, it is vital to remember that it represents an educated guess - not a sentence and not fate. Patients suffering from other conditions or those who have relapsed from previous treatment have a worse prognosis. Patients who are newly diagnosed may have a higher survival rate because treatment for mesothelioma is continuing to improve.